Health News

The US ranks at the top of the world’s coronavirus death toll of more than 1 million

The global Covid-19 death toll has crossed one million — and the United States accounts for more than 20%. It took less than eight months to go from the first reported coronavirus-related death in Wuhan, China, on January 9 to a global death toll of 1,001,800 on early Tuesday morning, according to data from Johns…

Puberty in a pandemic? It’s not all bad news, experts say

For many, the pandemic has scrambled any sense of passing time. Parents and pediatricians know better: Babies turn into toddlers, who turn into elementary school students, who eventually hit puberty. Kids grow up no matter what happens in the outside world. “I have a number of patients who have gotten their periods since the pandemic…

Dentists are seeing more cracked teeth. Pandemic stress is to blame

Shingles, maskne, migraines and quarantine fatigue: The stress of the pandemic has manifested in a variety of physical ailments. The latest evidence of this is a rise in cracked teeth. “We have seen an increasing amount of fractured teeth in probably the past six months,” said Dr. Paul Koshgerian, an oral surgeon with The Oral…

Source: CDC director concerned Atlas is sharing misleading information with Trump

US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Robert Redfield is concerned that White House Coronavirus Task Force member Dr. Scott Atlas is providing President Trump with misleading information about Covid-19, a federal official told CNN. NBC News reported Monday that Redfield was overheard during a phone call in public on a commercial airline…

How environmental conditions like cold and wet weather can affect pandemics, and what that means for COVID-19

Numerous scientists have studied how the 1918 flu spread to become the deadliest pandemic in history and which interventions worked, research that is becoming increasingly relevant during the current coronavirus crisis. But little research has been done on how environmental conditions affected the 1918 pandemic — until now. The 1918 flu coincided with the final…

How parental self-care helps kids weather pandemic stress

Parents are running on empty. As the pandemic drags on into month seven, many families are still struggling to patch together child care to help cover the basics, never mind slotting in time for parental self-care. Each new day seems to bring at least one family freak-out as tensions from too much togetherness butt up…

More than 1 million people worldwide have died of Covid-19

The world reached a somber milestone in the coronavirus pandemic Monday: More than a million people worldwide have died from Covid-19, according to Johns Hopkins University’s data. As of Monday evening, the global death toll is 1,000,555, according to that data. The United States accounts for more than 20% of global deaths and has the…

It’s a myth that women don’t want sex as they age, study finds

It’s a myth that women lose interest in sex as they enter midlife and beyond, according to new research that followed over 3,200 women for approximately 15 years. “About a quarter of women rate sex as very important, regardless of their age,” said Dr. Holly Thomas, lead author of an abstract being presented during the…

1 in 3 parents won’t get flu shots for their child during Covid-19, study finds

One-third of American parents have no plans to get their children vaccinated for the flu this year, according to the National Poll on Children’s Health released Monday, despite the very real possibility their child could also catch the deadly Covid-19. In addition, two-thirds of parents don’t believe getting a flu shot for their child is…

5 common coronavirus misconceptions and the science you need to know

Since the beginning of 2020, when we first started hearing about a new coronavirus, eventually dubbed SARS-CoV-2, our understanding of what it is, how it infects people, who it infects and how we can protect ourselves have all evolved as our knowledge has grown. But that evolution — and the changing information and recommendations that…

This is what happens to your body over months in isolation

Since the pandemic officially began in March, we’ve been told staying home is the best way to avoid catching Covid-19. And it is. But life in confinement can cause physical ailments on its own. Being homebound for so long contorts the body, weakens the heart and lungs and even impairs brain function. The effects of…

Experts are warning of a coming surge of Covid-19 cases in US

The US could see an explosion of Covid-19 cases as fall and winter set in, one expert says, joining a chorus of health officials who have warned about the challenges of the coming months. Two things will likely help drive that expected winter surge, according to Dr. Chris Murray, director of the University of Washington’s…

Coronavirus pandemic could impact cancer rates and care in the future

The news about cancer is good for now, but the future doesn’t look as bright, according to a report published this week by the American Association for Cancer Research. Progress in cancer care The AACR Cancer Progress Report 2020 found the number of cancer survivors living in the United States has reached a record high,…

Fewer than 10% in the US have antibodies to the novel coronavirus

A new nationwide study of the blood of more than 28,000 dialysis patients may help answer one of the big questions surrounding the pandemic: how many people have antibodies to SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus? The answer could tell us a lot about how many people in the United States have been exposed to the virus…

What the 1918 flu pandemic can teach us about coronavirus

At this point in the coronavirus pandemic, with more than 32 million infected and more than 980,000 dead worldwide, describing this time as “unprecedented” may sound like nails on a chalkboard. This pandemic, however, actually isn’t without precedent: The last time we dealt with a pandemic so mysterious, uncontained and far-reaching was in 1918, when…

Covid-19 vaccinations could start in November or December, Fauci says

Covid-19 vaccinations could start as early as November, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert, said Friday. Fauci’s comments come as the US passed 7 million confirmed cases of Covid-19, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. More than 203,000 people have died. Despite the prediction, Fauci says it could still be a…

FDA issues Benadryl warning as it investigates reports of teen injuries and deaths linked to TikTok challenge

The US Food and Drug Administration issued a warning Thursday over “serious problems with high doses” of the common over-the-counter allergy medication Benadryl. Too much diphenhydramine (Benadryl), can lead to severe health problems, including serious heart problems, seizures, coma and even death. The FDA cited reports of teenagers ending up in hospital emergency rooms or…

FDA warns popular dental filling could cause health problems for some patients

The US Food and Drug Administration warned Thursday that silver dental fillings, known as dental amalgam, may cause health problems for some high-risk groups. The updated FDA guidance said the filling material could lead to health issues for those with a hypersensitivity to mercury. Dental amalgam fillings are a mixture of silver, tin, copper and…

Countries should meet these five criteria before easing lockdowns, study says. Many aren’t even close

Countries should not ease coronavirus lockdown restrictions until they meet five criteria — and many nations are not even close, according to a new analysis published in The Lancet medical journal. The research, published Thursday, said that the prerequisites for easing Covid-19 measures are: knowledge of infection status, community engagement, adequate public health capacity, adequate…

By August, 1 in 5 Covid-19 cases was someone in their 20s

The median age of people diagnosed with coronavirus keeps getting lower. In May, the median age of confirmed cases was 46. By July, that number had dropped to 37. By August, 1 out of every 5 confirmed coronavirus cases is a person in their 20s, according to new data published Wednesday by the US Centers…

Scientists sequence the 92-year-old mold that produced the first antibiotic, penicillin

The accidental discovery of penicillin by Alexander Fleming in 1928, when mold contaminated one of his petri dishes, changed the course of modern medicine, with antibiotics key to the decline of many diseases over the course of the 20th century. Now, scientists have woken up Fleming’s original Penicillium mold and sequenced its genome for the…

Students with special needs face virtual learning challenges

Virtual learning facilitator is a full-time job these days for Alicia Burgstahler. The Philadelphia woman, 39, is mother to two children, a 16-year-old son named Jaydon Scott and a 12-year-old daughter named Oliviah Scott. Both kids are sheltering in place due to the coronavirus pandemic. Both kids are in public school full time, online. Both…

UK mulling vaccine trials that deliberately expose volunteers to Covid-19

The British government is exploring the possibility of clinical trials in which volunteers are deliberately exposed to coronavirus to test the effectiveness of vaccine candidates, the UK Department for Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) revealed Wednesday in a statement. “We are working with partners to understand how we might collaborate on the potential development…

Belly fat linked to early death, study finds

It’s more bad new for America’s growing waistline: Excess belly fat is associated with a higher risk of early death from any cause, regardless of how much overall body fat you have, a new study finds. In women, each 10-centimeter increase in belly fat raised the risk of death from any cause by 8%. For…

Using weed during pregnancy linked to psychotic-like behaviors in children, study finds

If you’re one of the growing numbers of women who use weed while pregnant, think twice: A new study found it may increase psychotic-like behaviors in children. The study, published Wednesday in JAMA Psychiatry, analyzed data on 11,489 children who were followed as part of the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, which says it’s…

Daily couch Pilates: Strengthen your core with this 5-minute routine

The times we live in are a lot. It can be all too easy to throw your hands up and just veg out on the couch — all the while knowing you’ll be sore afterward. You can turn that couch, however, into your secret weapon to feeling better and stronger. For this Pilates core and…

More than 20 states report an uptick in new Covid-19 cases after US tops 200,000 deaths

More than 200,000 Americans have lost their lives to Covid-19 since the start of the pandemic, and the country is now transitioning into a new season with worrisome trends. The devastating death toll comes ahead of what experts caution could be a complicated flu season. In the next three months, another 150,000 people could lose…

Johnson & Johnson’s coronavirus vaccine is fourth to begin Phase 3 trials in the United States

Johnson & Johnson’s Covid-19 vaccine candidate begins Phase 3 trials in the United States today. Trials for the single-dose vaccine will include up to 60,000 adult participants at nearly 215 sites in the US and internationally. Phase 3 trials will begin immediately, with the first participants receiving doses on Wednesday, Johnson & Johnson Chief Scientific…

FDA must do more to regulate thousands of chemicals added to your food, petitioners say

Pretend you’re pregnant. You’re careful about every morsel you put into your mouth, exquisitely conscious about the potential impact on your growing baby’s development. But there is a catch: No matter how careful you may be, the food you eat and the beverages you drink likely contain one or more of some 10,000 chemicals allowed…

A healthy sex life boosts long-term survival hopes for heart attack victims

People who have had heart attacks can boost their chances of long-term survival by returning to normal levels of sexual activity, a new study shows. Many people stop having sex after a heart attack in the belief that it could trigger another episode, but research published Wednesday in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology says…

FDA considering authorization rules that could push coronavirus vaccine past Election Day

The US Food and Drug Administration is considering new rules for authorization for a Covid-19 vaccine, according to three sources familiar with the situation — and calculations show these rules would push an authorization beyond Election Day. That would dash the hopes of President Trump, who has said repeatedly the vaccine could be ready by…

Blacks and Hispanics are twice as likely to test positive for Covid-19, says a new study

Black and Hispanic people are twice as likely to test positive for Covid-19 as White people even after adjusting for outside factors, says a new study. The disparity cannot be entirely explained by underlying health conditions, place of residence or place of care, according to the study published Tuesday in the journal PLOS Medicine. Christopher…

Trick-or-treating, costume masks and Halloween parties discouraged by CDC this year

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued its first guidance for the holidays, including Halloween, amid the raging coronavirus pandemic in a new posting on its website Monday night. Door-to-door trick-or-treating and costume masks and parties are discouraged this year due to the pandemic, the CDC said. “Many traditional Halloween activities can…

Begin Covid-19 vaccine trials for children, pediatric specialists say

With the US surpassing 200,000 deaths due to Covid-19, a group of pediatric infectious disease specialists is calling for vaccine trials for children. There are three large-scale vaccine trials for adults in the US, but none has begun for children, who are “stuck in neutral,” eight physicians said in a commentary published Friday in the…

50 fun things to do this fall (take your pick)

As we head into autumn in the Northern Hemisphere and temperatures start to cool down, the pandemic can’t change that it’s still the season of leaves falling and light sweaters and jackets, with the morning and twilight feeling crisp but not too chilly. Not yet. You can get really amazing ideas of what to do…

Quitting smoking apps that help you acknowledge your triggers work better, study shows

If you’re trying to quit smoking, it could pay to acknowledge and accept your cravings rather than avoid them. And downloading a smartphone app that takes that approach could increase your odds of success, according to a study published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine. “The problem is that when you try to avoid what you’re…

CDC abruptly removes guidance about airborne coronavirus transmission, says update ‘was posted in error’

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday abruptly reverted to its previous guidance about how coronavirus is transmitted, removing language about airborne transmission it had posted just days earlier. “A draft version of proposed changes to these recommendations was posted in error to the agency’s official website. CDC is currently updating its…

Pine-Sol cleaner has been approved to kill coronavirus on hard surfaces

Pine-Sol’s original cleaner has been approved by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a product that can kill the coronavirus on frequently used surfaces. The product was added to the agency’s list of products expected to kill the virus after meeting the criteria for use against SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes Covid-19, an EPA…

Updated CDC guidance acknowledges coronavirus can spread through the air

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated guidance on its website to say coronavirus can commonly spread “through respiratory droplets or small particles, such as those in aerosols,” which are produced even when a person breathes. “Airborne viruses, including COVID-19, are among the most contagious and easily spread,” the site now says. Previously,…

Internal AstraZeneca safety report sheds light on neurological condition suffered by vaccine trial participant

CNN has obtained an internal safety report by pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca that sheds light on the neurological condition suffered by one of the participants in its coronavirus vaccine clinical trial. The report details how the study volunteer, a previously healthy 37-year-old woman, “experienced confirmed transverse myelitis” after receiving her second dose of the vaccine, and…

Pharma company drastically boosts its potential coronavirus vaccine production

German pharmaceutical company BioNTech, which is currently developing a possible vaccine against the novel coronavirus together with US drug giant Pfizer, announced Thursday it was buying a new production plant in order drastically to increase its production capacities. BioNTech said the acquisition of the vaccine plant in Marburg, Germany, from the pharmaceutical firm Novartis, would…

Coronavirus measures may help blunt flu season, experts say

The United States may not see a “double whammy” this fall of both the coronavirus and influenza, Dr. Anthony Fauci said Thursday. The director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases pointed to the Southern Hemisphere, where it’s late winter. Australia has experienced an almost non-existent flu season, Fauci said in an interview…

When does a good attitude become toxic positivity?

Between sleepless nights, diapers and feeding times, having small children at home could leave Priscilla Goins feeling exhausted. She loved her kids, but it was a lot. “I would sometimes say ‘I just want a minute to myself,’” Goins, of Knoxville, Tennessee, said. “People would be like: ‘Oh, you’ll miss it when they’re older.’” And…

Federal government details plans to distribute free Covid-19 vaccines

The federal government released plans on Wednesday detailing how it will distribute Covid-19 vaccines once they’ve been okayed by the US Food and Drug Administration. Operation Warp Speed aims to have Covid-19 vaccines moving to administration sites within 24 hours of an FDA license or emergency use authorization, an official said. And the aim is…

Trump knew testing Covid-19 vaccines would take months, Woodward book shows

President Donald Trump knew back in the spring that it would probably take a year to develop a coronavirus vaccine, according to interviews with journalist Bob Woodward. Trump also suggests that’s why he initially pushed so hard for the use of the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, because the malaria drug had already been tested and approved…

How to help siblings get along better

Sibling rivalry is often taken as an unexamined fact of family life — as much a part of parenting as potty training or bedtime stories. But experts say parents don’t have to put up with the bickering and the fights: There are strategies and techniques to help brothers and sisters get along better, strengthening a…

7 steps that can lower your blood pressure as you age

Want to live a longer, healthier life? One way is to keep your blood pressure at optimal levels as you age — preferably below 120 systolic (the top number) and 80 diastolic (the lower number). That’s especially important during the pandemic, because having high blood pressure is one of the possible risk factors for developing…

Trump mental health official accuses media of overblowing dangers of Covid-19

The assistant secretary of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Dr. Elinore McCance-Katz, accused the media of being dishonest about the coronavirus pandemic and reiterated talking points about Covid-19 that President Donald Trump has pushed for months, including complaints that schools should reopen for in-person learning and that very few children are affected…

PTSD may double risk of dementia, new analysis finds

People who experience post-traumatic stress disorder may be twice as likely to have dementia later in life, according to a new study — a finding with important implications for the coronavirus pandemic. The disorder occurs when symptoms from a psychological trauma disrupt daily functioning for at least a month. The nation has been reeling from…

CDC study finds coronavirus rarely kills children, but minorities at higher risk

Children and teens from minority groups are disproportionately hit by coronavirus, just as older adults are, according to the findings of a new report from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Children from ethnic and racial minorities, those with underlying health conditions and those between the ages of 18 and 20 are more…

Some pediatricians refuse to treat kids if parents reject vaccines, study finds

If you choose not to have your child vaccinated, your pediatrician may refuse to treat your family. More than half of pediatricians’ offices in the United States included in a new study published in the medical journal JAMA reported having a dismissal policy for families who refuse to vaccinate their children. Some physicians say this…

Study hints Covid-19 may have been in the US as early as December

Researchers believe they have found evidence that the novel coronavirus may have been circulating in the US as early as late December, about a month before the current timeline from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows. This study, published last Thursday in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, found a statistically significant…

Here’s why a vaccine will not stop the Covid-19 pandemic right away

Dr. Umair Shah remembers the last mass vaccination campaign the US waged. It was in 2009, when the H1N1 “swine” flu broke out in April, right at the end of the regular flu season. “That was very challenging,” Shah, who heads the Harris County, Texas, health department, told CNN. “There were a lot of moving…

Study says Covid-19 may have arrived in US in December — earlier than thought

The deadly coronavirus may have circulated in the United States as early as December, about a month earlier than believed by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, according to researchers with UCLA. Their study, published last Thursday in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, found a statistically significant increase in clinic and hospital…

How to sleep better — kids and grown-ups alike

Like many moms, Sofia Axelrod found the lack of sleep really hard after giving birth. But unlike many moms, she refused to accept that the exhaustion was inevitable. “Sleep deprivation is so detrimental,” said sleep consultant Axelrod, who is a neuroscientist at Rockefeller University in New York. “I didn’t just want to suck it up…

Depression and anxiety during and after pregnancy may harm childhood development, study finds

A mother’s depression and anxiety from conception through the first year of the baby’s life is associated with negative developmental outcomes through adolescence, according to a study published Monday in the journal JAMA Pediatrics. That could affect a lot of women: About 15% to 23% of women worldwide experience anxiety during pregnancy, while 15% deal…

Poor sleep linked to weight gain in 2-year smartphone sleep tracking study

Not sleeping enough or getting a bad night’s sleep over and over makes it hard to control your appetite. And that sets you up for all sorts of health problems, including obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure and Type 2 diabetes. The link between poor sleep and a greater body mass index (BMI) has been…

Sex gets complicated during the pandemic

When the pandemic hit, couples found themselves worrying about getting sick, losing income, teaching their children at home while working full time (or worrying full time about sending them to school). It hardly makes a perfect recipe for sex. The stress has been too much for one Texas couple in their mid-40s with two children,…

Craving sugar during a pandemic? Here’s how to tame your sweet tooth

Cakes, cookies, pie. During a global pandemic or even more moderately stressful life circumstances, we often turn to comforting sugary and carb-rich indulgences that may help to calm us down. Now for the bad news. New recommendations that will inform soon-to-be-released US dietary guidelines reveal we should further limit the amount of sugar we consume.…

Grandparents Day 2020: 5 tips for a safe grandparent-grandchild visit

Dear Grandma, We know you’re itching to see your grandkids after spending the last few weeks in isolation. But a visit with family may not be the safest idea at the moment. Staying home is the best way to stop the spread of the coronavirus. But if your heart is set on a playdate, there…

AstraZeneca’s Oxford vaccine trial to resume, the university says

The AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine trial, halted last week after an unexplained illness in one of the volunteers, will resume, the University of Oxford announced Saturday. The university, which is developing the vaccine with AstraZeneca, did not say when the trial would resume. AstraZeneca said the trial will only resume in the United Kingdom, adding that…

My lifelong Muppets obsession helped me explain the pandemic to my preschooler

Growing up with “Sesame Street” in the early 1980s, I found pieces of myself in Cookie Monster’s sweet tooth, Big Bird’s gentleness and in Grover, who was outgoing and always willing to help others, even though he made a lot of hilarious mistakes. There was even a lady named Maria who was Puerto Rican, just…

Some college towns grapple with Covid-19 after students return for fall semester

While many colleges and universities are offering classes online, that hasn’t necessarily stopped students from gathering. And now some college towns are grappling with outbreaks of Covid-19 as the start of the fall semester complicates local responses to the pandemic. “We are urging students to understand the imperative role that they play in stopping this…

Wildfire smoke and your health: Do you need to worry?

Wildfires have broken out across the United States on an unprecedented scale, with 77 large complexes of fires engulfing 3 million acres in a matter of weeks. While the fires themselves only cover a small portion of California, Oregon and Washington, at least 24 people have died as of September 11. And the smoke they…

Even children with no symptoms can spread Covid-19, CDC report shows

Even children with mild or no symptoms can spread Covid-19, according to contact tracing data from three Utah child care facilities released Friday. Twelve children, including one eight-month-old, got Covid-19 in a child care facility and spread it to at least 12 people outside the facilities. The data shows children can carry the virus from…

Covid-19 school closings linked to increase in depression and suicide, study finds

Primary school students in China experienced more depressive symptoms and made more suicide attempts after schools closed for the pandemic, a new study found. When Covid-19 hit China in January, the Ministry of Education postponed the start of spring semester to late April. That closure separated children from their friends and their broader community network,…

Fauci says normal life may not be back until the end of 2021

Dr. Anthony Fauci said it could be the end of 2021 before life gets back to how it was before Covid-19. “If you’re talking about getting back to a degree of normality which resembles where we were prior to Covid, it’s going to be well into 2021, maybe even towards the end of 2021,” Fauci…

Yes, you can have Covid-19 and the flu at the same time. Here’s what that could do to your body

As doctors worry about a coronavirus-and-flu “twin-demic” that could overwhelm the health care system, Americans must contend with another possibility: fighting both viruses at the same time. “You can certainly get both the flu and Covid-19 at the same time, which could be catastrophic to your immune system,” said Dr. Adrian Burrowes, a family medicine…

US could see a ‘very deadly December’ with tens of thousands of coronavirus death to come, computer model predicts

An influential model is predicting a catastrophic winter with a significant rise in coronavirus deaths. A possible scenario sees 415,090 Covid-19 deaths by January, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington says in its latest forecast. The worst-case scenario is 600,000 deaths by January 1. “When we look ahead…

9/11 and Covid-19: 2 mass trauma events with different recovery challenges

Kate Colbert was first diagnosed with Covid-19 in late March, and she’s been fighting both physical symptoms and emotional trauma ever since. Calling a radiology department to follow up on her doctor’s order to get an emergency angiogram in May, she started sobbing when the receptionist said she could not schedule the procedure until she…

US e-cigarette sales rose by nearly 300%, says a new CDC report

US e-cigarette sales rose by nearly 300% between November 2016 and August 2019, says a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The report, released Wednesday, uses retail scanner data. It showed a 122% increase in e-cigarette sales from September 2014 to May 2020 and a 294% increase from November 2016 to…

World Suicide Prevention Day: Here’s how to help

Every 40 seconds, someone in the world takes their own life. That’s at least 800,000 people a year, according to the World Health Organization, and the numbers are rising in some parts of the world. In the United States alone, suicide rates have increased by 35% between 1999 and 2018. The US Centers for Disease…

Get tested for coronavirus if you socialized closely over Labor Day, Dr. Birx says

People who let down their guard and got too close to others over Labor Day weekend should get tested for Covid-19, White House coronavirus task coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx said. Much of the coronavirus spread by people who don’t have symptoms is happening between and within families and in settings such as neighborhood parties, Birx…

The 1918 flu caused Halloween cancellations across the US. It could happen again

On the list of traditions canceled by the coronavirus pandemic, Halloween might be next on the cultural hit list. Los Angeles County, for example, has led the charge by issuing formal guidance that recommends against trick-or-treating and bans outright haunted houses, festivals and other traditional festivities that would fall under current Covid-19 health guidelines, according…

Covid-19 drug rationed in the US is plentiful in developing countries

During the coronavirus surge in Texas this summer, Dr. Thomas Patterson said he only had enough of the anti-viral drug remdesivir for about a third of his patients, and was forced to pick and choose who would get the only drug authorized in the United States to treat Covid-19. Meanwhile, Dr. Ahmedul Kabir in Bangladesh…

Got a stress headache? This 5-minute routine brings relief

Do you have a pounding headache from work and family stress at home? The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns that pandemics can be stressful and cause feelings of fear and anxiety. Couple the pandemic with being cooped up at home with family while working and kids home from school, and you may…

The FDA’s new app for frontline doctors could help discover Covid-19 treatments faster

In the trenches of the fight against coronavirus, Dr. Raghav Tirupathi often has little time to think and no textbook to follow while treating patients with Covid-19. That’s why the infectious disease specialist in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, finds himself increasingly turning for guidance to Cure ID, an app developed by the US Food and Drug Administration…

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