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World News

Hubble spies the culprit behind Betelgeuse star’s dimming. And it may be happening again

The Hubble Space Telescope may have solved the mystery of the curiously dimming star Betelgeuse, according to new research. And to add even more intrigue to the story, the star appears to be dimming again, which is unexpectedly early based on what astronomers know about the star. The study published Thursday in The Astrophysical Journal.…

The reason we’re shooting laser beams between Earth and the moon

For the first time ever, scientists received a signal after sending laser beams from Earth to a reflector on NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter around the moon. The successful signal was received after multiple attempts over the last decade, and the results of the study could complement future laser experiments used to study space. A laser…

Russian power lifter fractures both knees while attempting to squat nearly 900 pounds

A Russian power lifter broke both his knees while trying to lift nearly 900 pounds. Alexander Sedykh was seriously injured while competing in the 2020 World Raw Powerlifting Federation (WPRF) Championships held in Dolgoprudny, which is in the Moscow region of Russia, the Russian state-run news agency RIA Novosti reported. In a video posted by…

Climate change spelled doom for woolly rhinos 14,000 years ago, study says

Woolly rhinos went extinct at the end of the last ice age in Siberia about 14,000 years ago, and now ancient DNA is helping to shed light on what really happened to them and other large mammals. Previously, it was believed that humans hunted these giant animals as they spread across the globe. But new…

This 429 million-year-old trilobite eye is similar to those of modern insects

Eyes don’t typically appear in the fossil record, but researchers were able to study the well-preserved and fossilized internal structure of a 429 million-year-old trilobite eye. Surprisingly, they found that the structure of the eye was nearly identical to the compound eyes of modern bees, dragonflies and crustaceans, according to the new study. The study…

Last decade was Earth’s hottest on record, exposing grim reality of climate change

A new report released Wednesday details how 2019 was another year of extremes for Earth’s climate, adding to a litany of evidence exposing the grim reality of our warming world. Last year saw devastating wildfires burn through Australia; large regions including Europe, Japan, Pakistan, and India experienced deadly heat waves; almost 100 tropical cyclones created…

Birds and reptiles cry similar tears to humans, says new research

Birds and reptiles may not resemble humans in many ways, but they cry similar tears. The composition of human tears is well known, but until now, there was very little research into the composition and structures of tears in reptiles, birds and other mammals. That lack of research could be considered a crying shame since…

Astronomers find galaxy similar to Milky Way more than 12 billion light-years away

Our Milky Way galaxy has a bit of a look-alike in an unlikely place: the early universe. Astronomers used ALMA, or the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array of telescopes, based in Chile, to find the galaxy located more than 12 billion light-years away from our own. That means the light from this galaxy has traveled for…

Regular bricks can be transformed into energy storage devices

Whether humans were erecting Neolithic dwellings, ranch-style homes or modern McMansions, bricks have been a favorite of builders for thousands of years. Now, chemists have discovered new potential in these ubiquitous building blocks: Through a series of reactions, scientists have shown that conventional bricks can be transformed into energy storage devices powerful enough to turn…

Gray reef sharks form long-lasting social groups likely for hunting, study shows

We can’t quite say sharks can be friends, but new evidence is showing us that sharks form social bonds with others and can work together — to a degree. Gray reef sharks regularly meet up together in the same groups, according to a new study published on Tuesday in the Proceedings of the Royal Society.…

New Zealand reinstates coronavirus restrictions after first locally transmitted case in 102 days

New Zealand’s most populous city has gone back under lockdown after new locally transmitted coronavirus cases broke the 102-day streak the country had gone without recording a local infection. New Zealand’s Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern confirmed four new locally transmitted coronavirus cases on Tuesday night, and announced that Auckland will temporarily see level three restrictions…

Perseid meteor shower 2020: How and when to watch

The Perseid meteor shower, one of the most popular meteor showers of the year, will face some competition from the moon this year during its peak. The shower will peak with the most number of meteors during the late evening hours of August 11 and early morning hours of August 12 — which coincides with…

A doctor runs 22 miles in a face mask to prove that they are safe

A doctor in England wanted to prove that face masks won’t impair your oxygen levels. So he ran for 22 miles while wearing one. Throughout his running journey, Tom Lawton used a pulse oximeter to monitor his oxygen levels. The medical device measures the saturation of oxygen in a person’s red blood cells and typically…

Meet ‘Mad Hatterpillar,’ the caterpillar that uses its old heads for defense

In the dense eucalyptus forests of Australia, deadheads forage leaves and wriggle their bodies around. No, these aren’t Grateful Dead fanatics stranded since the psychedelic shows of the 1970s. Native to Australia, Uraba lugens is a strange caterpillar that stacks its molted heads atop each other. With every molt, the stack becomes an increasingly tall,…

Main opposition candidate goes into hiding on eve of crucial presidential vote in Belarus

The main opposition candidate in Belarus’ Sunday presidential election went into hiding the night before challenging longtime leader Alexander Lukashenko, who is seeking his sixth term. Svetlana Tikhanovskaya’s campaign said she fled her apartment due to safety reasons after police detained several of its senior staffers, in what critics called an attempt to intimidate the…

Brazil passes 100,000 Covid-19 deaths, as cases top 3 million

Brazil surpassed 100,000 deaths from Covid-19 on Saturday as cases exceeded 3 million, according to the latest numbers by the country’s Health Ministry. The fatalities milestone comes less than five months after Brazil recorded its first Covid-19-related death. The ministry said 100,477 people have lost their lives and 3,012,412 have been infected. In the last…

In the aftermath of a disaster, one group looks out for Beirut’s lost and hurt pets

As a grieving Beirut rebuilds its homes, businesses and lives, some Good Samaritans are making sure that one group of vulnerable residents are not forgotten. More than 190 volunteers have been scouring the streets of the blast-damaged city for lost pets. They search for animals trapped in the rubble, tend to the injured and care…

What you need to know about coronavirus on Friday, August 7

More than 19 million people around the world have now been infected with the coronavirus, and 715,024 have died. The number of new daily cases has topped 200,000 — a level not seen before July — for 23 days in row. In India, the number of infections surpassed 2 million today. The speed at which…

Couple standing less than 600 meters from blast site survives Beirut explosion

The glass and debris from Tuesday’s explosion in Beirut injured Imad Khalil and Lina Alameh, but both say they are lucky to be alive. The husband and wife now lay in a local hospital room, together, recovering from the glass and debris that tore through their apartment — and them. Lina needed three hours of…

Doctored videos are already faking the cause of Beirut’s explosion

Doctored videos of Tuesday’s devastating explosion in Beirut are already circulating on every major social media platform. In videos originally shot by both CNN and eyewitnesses in the Lebanese capital, footage of a rising smoke plume at Beirut Port was inverted and made to look like a “negative.” In addition, a missile-like object was superimposed…

Prehistoric ‘hell ants’ hunted their prey with unusual headgear

Sometime during the Cretaceous period, 99 million years ago, a prehistoric hell ant trapped a tasty treat — a relative of the cockroach — in its scythe-like jaw and protruding horn. It’s still there. The act was captured in tree resin and later unearthed in amber in what is now Myanmar. The unusual find shows…

Scientists have unraveled the riddle of a real-life sea monster

For more than a hundred years, the fossil of the Tanystropheus has puzzled scientists. The strange reptile — resembling a real-life Loch Ness Monster or a prehistoric crocodile crossed with a giraffe — was first described in 1852 and first reconstructed in 1973. Palaeontologists have long known that the species once lived in Switzerland’s Monte…

Seabird poop is worth millions, say scientists trying to save the birds

Some hot commodities are obvious: gold, oil, corn and more recently, hand sanitizer, are clearly worth a lot. But some valuable products are less evident — and much more off-putting. New research has revealed that the waste produced by seabirds — that’s right, the poop of seagulls, pelicans, and penguins — could be worth nearly…

The Canadian government is allowing 4 terminally ill patients to use psychedelic mushrooms to help ease their anxiety

The Canadian government will allow four patients with incurable cancer to receive psilocybin therapy, which uses the drug found in the so-called “magic mushrooms” or “shrooms,” to ease their end-of-life distress. The landmark decision by Minister of Health Patty Hajdu, marks the first time since 1974 that a legal exemption has been given in Canada…

What you need to know about coronavirus on Thursday, August 6

“As long as you have any member of society, any demographic group, who’s not seriously trying to get to the end game of suppressing this, it will continue to smolder and smolder and smolder, and that will be the reason why, in a non-unified way, we’ve plateaued at an unacceptable level.” Dr. Anthony Fauci did…

Toxic chemicals from burning fossil fuels poison dolphins and whales on East Coast

High levels of toxic chemicals have been found in stranded dolphins and whales along the southeastern coast of the United States, according to a new study published on Wednesday. Arsenic, mercury and other chemicals were found in their bodies, giving more information on contaminant concentrations in dolphins and other toothed whales, researchers said. Toothed whales…

How to help Beirut explosion victims

At least 100 people are dead and 4,000 wounded following an explosion in Lebanon’s capital city of Beirut. While it is still unclear what caused the explosion, the city is decimated with thousands of residents left homeless, a medical system already strained from coronavirus and up to $5 billion worth of damage. You can help…

Satellite images of Beirut explosion show massive crater at port

Satellite images, obtained by CNN from Planet Labs Inc., show a massive crater at the site of Tuesday’s explosion in Beirut’s port. The images show nearly every building has either sustained significant damage or has been been destroyed by the blast. (If the images above are not displaying properly, click here.) Massive grain silos that…

Satellite imagery reveals new penguin colonies in Antarctica

Satellite imaging has revealed that there are nearly 20% more emperor penguin colonies in Antarctica than previously thought. However, while the discovery has been welcomed, the previously undiscovered animals will act as “canaries in the coalmine” when it comes to studying the impact of global warming, experts have said. Scientists discovered 11 new colonies, meaning…

Lasers in daylight can better detect space debris orbiting Earth, new study suggests

In director Alfonso Cuaron’s 2013 space thriller “Gravity,” Sandra Bullock’s astronaut character dons a suit for a spacewalk in orbit around Earth, upgrading hardware on the Hubble Space Telescope. With just a few minutes’ warning, a field of space debris comes hurtling toward the team’s space shuttle, disabling the craft and killing the remaining crew…

The correct way to make tea? Science weighs in on microwaving vs. kettle

An American woman’s TikTok guide to making hot tea that went viral in June had Brits tut-tutting in horror over their morning cuppa — largely because of the controversial use of a microwave rather than a kettle to heat water. The spat over the best way to brew tea boiled over into a transatlantic incident,…

We’re facing a ‘generational catastrophe’ in education, UN warns

The world is facing a “generational catastrophe” because of school closures during the coronavirus pandemic, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned Tuesday. “Getting students back into schools and learning institutions as safely as possible must be a top priority,” once local transmission of Covid-19 is under control, he added. Guterres said that in mid-July, schools were…

What you need to know about coronavirus on Tuesday, August 4

Two more teenagers, between the ages of 14 and 17, have died from Covid-19 in Florida — bringing the total deaths of children and teens in the state to seven. More than 38,000 minors have contracted the coronavirus in Florida, a hotpot of the pandemic in the United States. The deaths are a reminder that while…

Eaten water beetles stay alive by escaping through the predator’s anus

Because of their small size, water beetles might have been kicked around since they were born — but thanks to abnormal survival strategies, they’re “stayin’ alive” after predators eat them. Meet the aquatic beetle Regimbartia attenuata, which can survive a journey through a dark-spotted frog’s gut and exit alive through its feces, according to a…

What you need to know about coronavirus on Monday, August 3

No one is safe from the coronavirus. Dr. Deborah Birx really wants that message to hit home. The White House coronavirus response coordinator warned yesterday that the United States had entered a “new phase” in the pandemic. “What we are seeing today is different from March and April. It is extraordinarily widespread,” Birx told CNN,…

See the ‘space butterfly’ astronomers captured from thousands of light years away

Thousands of light years away, there’s a “space butterfly” colored with brilliant blues and clouds of purple and red. It’s an image we’ve never seen in this much detail before. So named for its resemblance to the winged insect, the “butterfly” is actually a planetary nebula — a giant cloud of gas that forms around…

Thousands gather in Berlin to protest against Covid-19 restrictions

A large crowd of far-right groups gathered for a “sit-in” at Berlin’s iconic Brandenburg Gate on Saturday to protest against the German government’s coronavirus restrictions. A march earlier Saturday that was criticized by police for not adhering to rules on social distancing and face masks was halted by organizers. The march, which was named by…

The long road to returning first-ever samples from Mars

When NASA’s Perseverance rover touches down on Mars in February 2021, the mission will spend the next two years exploring one of the oldest and most intriguing sites on the red planet: Jezero Crater. It’s the site of an ancient lake bed and river delta that existed between 3 and 4 billion years ago —…

What is Eid al-Adha, and how is it being celebrated during the pandemic?

One of the most important festivals of the Islamic calendar, Eid al-Adha marks the height of the annual Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia. It commemorates the story in the Quran of God appearing to Ibrahim — also known as Abraham — in a dream and commanding him to sacrifice his son as an…

What you need to know about coronavirus on Friday, July 31

The economic toll of the pandemic is becoming clear. In just a few months, the virus has managed to wipe out years of gains and push millions of people around the world into new economic hardship. Data released yesterday showed the US economy slumped by 9.5% in the second quarter compared to the same period…

The Perseverance rover is on its way to Mars. What’s next?

The NASA Perseverance rover has been confirmed to be healthy and is now on a journey to Mars. It will take between 6.5 and seven months before the rover lands on the red planet in February 2021. “The mission has 314 million miles of interplanetary space and seven minutes of terror to get safely onto…

Mars launch: NASA sends Perseverance rover to space

The Perseverance rover and its Ingenuity helicopter are finally on the journey to Mars. The spacecraft carrying the rover and helicopter successfully launched to Mars Thursday morning aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 541 rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida at 7:50 a.m. ET. The team in the control center at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory…

NASA’s Perseverance rover is ready to launch on Thursday

The Perseverance rover is finally ready to launch on its journey to Mars on Thursday. The Mars 2020 mission will launch after nearly a decade of hard work and planning by thousands of engineers, scientists and specialists at NASA centers across the country and their commercial partners. The rover is scheduled to launch on Thursday,…

A report says China is suspected of hacking the Vatican. Here’s why

When you think about cyber espionage, the Vatican doesn’t come to mind as an obvious target. It’s a tiny country whose leader has more moral authority than worldly power. But China and the Vatican are expected to begin sensitive negotiations in September to a renew a secret deal over control of the Catholic Church in…

Record number of environmental activists killed in 2019

A record 212 land and environmental defenders were killed last year, equivalent to an average of more than four per week, according to a new report from NGO Global Witness. The figure makes 2019 the deadliest year on record for activists defending land and water resources from mining, agribusiness and fossil fuel interests, said Global…

What you need to know about coronavirus on Wednesday, July 29

Just when it seemed that Europe was getting to grips with the coronavirus pandemic, Covid-19 appears to be spreading again. Germany’s center for disease control, the Robert Koch Institute, said this week that a recent spike in cases was “very disturbing.” In France, new daily cases have crept back to the same level as when…

‘Cocktail receptions on Zoom are sad.’ United Nations diplomacy in the age of Covid-19

Nothing says diplomacy more than a hearty handshake. Touching, embraces, and cheek-to-cheek kisses represented daily life in the corridors and at receptions in the world arena of diplomacy: the United Nations in New York. Now, Covid-19 is striking at the heart of the United Nations itself. And many diplomats, some speaking to CNN on condition…

100 million-year-old sea microbes are alive and thriving, study finds

Humans can go without food for about three weeks before the effects of starvation begin to kill them. Some microbes deep underneath the seafloor have us beat: They can survive with barely any sustenance for more than 100 million years. These microorganisms live more than 18,000 feet underneath the ocean surface — in an area…

Hubble telescope captures stunningly clear image of summertime on Saturn

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has beamed back an amazing photo showing summertime on Saturn. Hubble captured the image on July 4, when the giant planet was 839 million miles from Earth, according to a statement from NASA released Thursday. It shows what summertime is like in Saturn’s northern hemisphere, which is pointed toward Earth, and…

This summer, multiple spacecraft are launching to Mars. Here’s why

If it seems like Mars is a popular destination right now, that’s for a reason: The chance to fly there only comes around every 26 months. Four missions were planned to launch to Mars this summer, including three rovers, from multiple space agencies. Two, including China’s Tianwen-1 (which is carrying a rover) and United Arab…

Think social distancing is hard? For these animals, it’s second nature

Exposed to a sick American bullfrog tadpole, a healthy tadpole will do its best to stay away. Garden ants and even lobsters also know to stay away when one of their own is sick. These animals are better at social distancing than we are. For many humans, social distancing feels like the most unnatural thing…

The art of a rover: Imagining Perseverance before it existed

The car-size Perseverance rover launching to Mars on July 30 is the heaviest and largest rover NASA has ever sent to the red planet. The plan for the Perseverance rover mission has unfolded over the last 10 years. It’s the next step in understanding the history of Mars and if ancient life once lived on…

WHO chief slams Pompeo’s claims he was bought by China

The World Health Organization chief attacked US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s “unacceptable” claims that the Director-General had been “bought” by China and said countries should focus on saving lives during the coronavirus pandemic, in one of his strongest rebuttals to date against criticism from the United States. Pompeo made the claim about Tedros Adhanom…

First chicken to ever cross the road was likely in Southeast Asia, scientists say

The first chicken to ever cross the road was likely in Southeast Asia, new research has revealed. Despite the prevalence of chickens — they outnumber all other birds on the planet with approximately 23 billion cluckers worldwide — centuries of scientists have struggled to determine exactly where they originated and how they were domesticated. Previous…

Have a low pain threshold? You might be part Neanderthal

Do you wince as you walk, or wake up with aches and pains? It could be down to your genes — your Neanderthal genes, that is. Many of us are part Neanderthal, with our genes carrying traces of past encounters between our early ancestors and the Stone Age hominins that populated Europe until around 40,000…

To stop vote meddling, Western leaders have to want to do something about it

The question is not whether Russia and China will try to influence Western elections — it’s whether Western governments have the wit and will to do something about it. In Washington, Democrats are warning of a fresh Russian effort to interfere in the upcoming US election with the apparent goal of helping President Donald Trump…

Ultraviolet flash detected by astronomers after ‘peculiar’ white dwarf supernova

Astronomers witnessed a flash of ultraviolet light after a white dwarf star exploded in a supernova, according to a new study. This is only the second time such an event has ever been observed. A white dwarf is the dense remnant of red giant stars once they explode. But white dwarfs can explode, too. Scientists…

Meet the flying robot that can glide, flip and hover

Engineers have designed a robot with flapping wings, which can perform nimble movements in the air, hovering, darting, diving and recovering like a bird or an insect. Humans have been trying to perfect flight for centuries. Leonardo da Vinci sketched plans for the first human-powered, flapping-wing aircraft, known as an ornithopter, more than 500 years…

You like leftovers? Turns out foxes 42,000 years ago did, too

Humans aren’t the only creatures who love leftovers. It turns out foxes during the Ice Age had a craving for them, too. Arctic foxes ate food scraps left by humans around 42,000 years ago, according to a new study published Wednesday in PLOS ONE journal. Researchers studied fox remains dating back to the ice age…

First image of 2 exoplanets orbiting a sun-like star captured by scientists

About 300 light-years away from us, two giant exoplanets are orbiting a young sun-like star. The proof is in the picture: Scientists have captured the first direct image of this system. By observing this system, centered around a star similar to ours that’s known as TYC 8998-760-1, astronomers can better understand how the planets in…

Humans may have arrived in North America much earlier than believed, new research says

Scientists have discovered evidence that may push back the timeline for humans living in North America from 13,000 years ago to 30,000 years ago, according to two new studies. The studies about the evidence of human occupation and its timing and effect published Wednesday in the journal Nature. The traditional understanding among scientists about the…

They were trying to save a species. Instead, scientists created a fish that’s part sturgeon, part paddlefish, all accident

A group of Hungarian aquatic scientists was looking for ways to save the fish responsible for some of the world’s finest caviar from extinction. Instead, they made a Frankenfish. But their accidental hybrid, a fish that’s part American paddlefish and part Russian sturgeon, could benefit fish farming and the industry’s carbon footprint. And on their…

Greta Thunberg will donate $114,000 to fight the coronavirus in the Brazilian Amazon

Teen climate activist Greta Thunberg will donate a portion of a $1.14 million prize to fighting coronavirus in the Brazilian Amazon. This week, Thunberg won the very first Gulbenkian Prize for Humanity, launched by Portugal’s Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, for her environmental activism. In a Twitter video accepting the honor, she said the winning prize was…

A massive asteroid shower hit Earth and the moon 800 million years ago, study says

Over the course of Earth’s ancient history, our planet has been blitzed with a variety of foreign objects, some of which may have triggered major events shaping this place we now call home. One such incident was a massive asteroid shower that bombarded both the Earth and the moon 800 million years ago, according to…

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